Content Tagged ‘Tegan Nia Swanson’

What’s Your Ecotone?: “I am drawn to any place near a large body of water”

This week, we hear from Tegan Nia Swanson, whose story “The Memory of Bones” appeared in Ecotone 15, and who currently lives in Lyon, France.

I am drawn to any place near a large body of water—the Pacific coast or the Amazon rainforest of Ecuador; the coral atolls of the Marshall Islands; the Boundary Waters between Minnesota and Canada; Lake Mendota in Madison, Wisconsin; the Mississippi River all the way from the headwaters to the Gulf. A kind of subliminal pressure pushes down on my soul when I spend too long away—like right now, when I am living in a city apartment building that’s surrounded by cement—and it happens so slowly that it’s almost unnoticeable at first. But as soon as I get near the water again, I realize how much less I had been in its absence. It might be clichéd or romanticized to think of this circumstance as stemming from some intrinsic biospiritual need, but I can’t explain it any other way.

maskTegan Nia Swanson is a graduate of the MFA Program in Creative Writing & Environment Program at Iowa State University, where she was the 2011 Pearl Hogrefe Fellow. Her fiction appears in Ecotone, Bellingham Review, Connu, and in the Black Earth Institute’s About Place Journal. Her novel-in-artifacts Things We Found When the Water Went Down won the 2014 Horatio Nelson Award for Fiction, and is forthcoming from Black Balloon Publishing/Catapult Co.

Lit News Roundup

Looking for a book job with a view beyond the Empire State Building? Bustle rounded up some of our peer indie presses from across the country. Like us, they’re championing unique and original voices that may have been eschewed, or were not the right fit, for the big five. Glad to see two of our Southern favorites in the mix: John F. Blair Publisher in Winston-Salem, NC (our distributor), and Hub City Press in Spartanburg, SC.

Speaking of indie presses, our publisher, Emily Louise Smith, will give a presentation at the Pamlico Writers Conference this weekend on the role of independents in the current book publishing landscape. If you missed it on Facebook, check out Pamlico’s interview with Emily.

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