Content Tagged ‘Edith Pearlman’

Quite a Day

We’re having quite the day here at Lookout Books!

First, it’s the official release day for John Rybicki’s When All the World Is Old.

AND this morning, The Boston Globe featured Leah Hager Cohen’s smart and engaging profile of the beautiful and wise Edith Pearlman on the cover of today’s “G” section.

I knew I liked Tuesdays!

– John Mortara, Lookout Intern

Binocular Vision Press Kits

Last week we were busy bees here in the Pub Lab! Edith Pearlman is coming to North Carolina for her tour soon (mid-April! Who’s ready?), and so we were getting together her press kits. They are so very beautiful, filled with reading guides, stickers, posters, Binocular Vision, and much more! All right, all right, enough ogling, it’s back to work for us!

– Sally J. Johnson, Lookout Intern

What’s Going On with Lookout Authors

Edith Pearlman

  • In case you haven’t heard, Edith’s Binocular Vision won the National Book Critics Circle Award last week.
  • She is also nominated for The Story Prize. The winners will be announced tomorrow, March 21!
  • Her next reading tour begins April 15 at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, with stops in Charlotte, Durham, and other cities to be announced.

Steve Almond

  • This guy writes like it’s his job. Well…you know what we mean. The Newer York
  • Steve also continues his “The Week in Greed” articles in The Rumpus.
  • His collection of short stories, God Bless America, received an honorable mention from The Story Prize.
  • (www.theneweryork.com) just published a flash fiction piece by Steve, as well as a featured quote we’re particularly fond of: “Stay horny for art.”

John Rybicki

  • First, you need to know that John’s astounding poetry collection, When All the World Is Old, will be available April 10. Pre-orders get it early, so be sure to visit www.lookout.org.
  • He will join Edith at the April 15 reading to celebrate the first year of our little press doing big things.

The Lookout Team Goes to the National Book Awards

While the Lookout Team was in New York, nervously pushing broccolini around our plates and awaiting the fiction announcement, an enormous (and enthusiastic) group of UNCW students, colleagues, and supporters squeezed into Costello’s Piano Bar in downtown Wilmington, NC to watch the ceremony stream live on the big screen and cheer on Lookout Books’ starlet Edith Pearlman.

Be still our hearts.

The very next night, you came out again. Two hundred people showed up to hear Steve Almond read at Lumina Theatre in Wilmington and to help celebrate the publication of Lookout’s second title, God Bless America.

Whether in the piano bar, the theatre, or curled up with your laptop in bed, you have supported us and literature in ways large and small—not only this week, but for the past year, as we’ve launched an imprint in an inhospitable publishing climate, as we’ve stumbled and succeeded and celebrated. We want to say thank you. Thank you for buying and reading our books, for sharing them, for believing in books as objects of art, as machines capable of rescue. For believing that literature matters.

We’re just getting started!

Love, your Lookout Team

See more photos from the National Book Awards taken by the Lookout staff.

The Luckiest Interns

One of the three interns invited to share in Edith Pearlman’s success at the National Book Awards this year, Arianne Beros wrote a featured article for Wilmington’s Star News.

Once we were settled in her office, Emily took a deep breath, pressed her hands together, and said, “We’re taking you with us to the National Book Awards ceremony.”

We were so stunned that no one spoke for a few seconds. What an incredible, unexpected opportunity.

Read the entire article here!

Today’s Binocular Vision excerpt from “Self-Reliance”

Sipping, not thinking, she drifted on a cobalt disk under an aquamarine dome. Birches bent to honor her, tall pines guarded the birches. She looked down the length of her body. She had not worn rubber boat shoes, only sandals, and her ten toenails winked flamingo.

The spring was in the middle of the roughly circular pond. Usually a boat given its freedom headed in that direction. Today, however, the canoe was obeying some private instructions. It had turned eastward; the lowering sun at her back further brightened her toenails. Her craft was headed toward the densely wooded stretch of shore where there were no houses. It was picking up speed. Cornelia considered shaking herself out of her lethargy, lifting the paddle, resuming control; but instead she watched the prow make its confident way toward trees and moist earth. It would never attain the shore, though, because there seemed to be a gulf between pond and land. No one had ever remarked on this cleavage. Perhaps it had only recently appeared, a fault developing in the last week or two; perhaps the land had receded from the pond or the pond recoiled from the land; at any rate, there it was: fissure, cleft…falls.

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Edith Pearlman receives 24th PEN/Malamud Award

Washington, DC––Edith Pearlman has been selected to receive the 24th annual PEN/Malamud Award. Given annually since 1988 in honor of the late Bernard Malamud, this award recognizes a body of work that demonstrates excellence in the art of short fiction. The announcement was made today by the directors of the PEN/Faulkner Foundation, Robert Stone and Susan Richards Shreve, Co-Chairs.

“Bernard Malamud expressed the hope that ‘expert practitioners of the short story, especially those who come rarely if ever to the novel, will be recognized’ so that their work might be ‘brought emphatically to public attention.’ With this prize, we hope to bring exactly such long-deserved attention emphatically to Ms. Pearlman’s beautifully crafted and deeply moving short fiction,” said Deborah Tannen, chair of the Malamud Award Selection Committee.

Edith Pearlman has published more than 250 works of short fiction and short non-fiction in national magazines, literary journals, anthologies, and on-line publications. Her work has appeared in Best American Short StoriesThe O. Henry Prize Collection,New Stories from the South, and The Pushcart Prize Collection Best of the Small Presses.

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