What’s Going On with Lookout Authors

Edith Pearlman

  • In case you haven’t heard, Edith’s Binocular Vision won the National Book Critics Circle Award last week.
  • She is also nominated for The Story Prize. The winners will be announced tomorrow, March 21!
  • Her next reading tour begins April 15 at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, with stops in Charlotte, Durham, and other cities to be announced.

Steve Almond

  • This guy writes like it’s his job. Well…you know what we mean. The Newer York
  • Steve also continues his “The Week in Greed” articles in The Rumpus.
  • His collection of short stories, God Bless America, received an honorable mention from The Story Prize.
  • (www.theneweryork.com) just published a flash fiction piece by Steve, as well as a featured quote we’re particularly fond of: “Stay horny for art.”

John Rybicki

  • First, you need to know that John’s astounding poetry collection, When All the World Is Old, will be available April 10. Pre-orders get it early, so be sure to visit www.lookout.org.
  • He will join Edith at the April 15 reading to celebrate the first year of our little press doing big things.

AWP Chicago Recap

Lookout Books was in Chicago for AWP last week! We were so excited to be part of such a great experience.

First, we flew in and were welcomed to cold, cold Chicago. Turns out the Windy City is aptly named. But no fear, we were cozy in the book fair at tables N5/N6 with UNCW’s MFA program, Ecotone and Chautauqua! So many great people came by to see us and buy books, and Edith Pearlman was there signing copies of Binocular Vision!

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What We Found at AWP

Every Wednesday we post about what we’re reading at the Lookout offices. The books and journals you find here are what inspire us. This week we’d like to highlight some of the publishers that caught our eye at AWP. Enjoy!

“I picked up A Boy from Ireland at the Persea Books table. It’s by Marie Raphael. I was first drawn to it because the cover was striking. Then I noticed the title, and I’ve always been drawn to Ireland. I’m almost done so I can say with confidence that it is really good.”

– Livingston Sheats, Pub Lab assistant director

 

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AWP Schwag

We just finished hand-making these wonderful little journals for AWP.

Get them at tables N5/N6 when you buy a Lookout book — Binocular Vision by Edith Pearlman, God Bless America by Steve Almond, or the not-yet-released poetry collection When All the World is Old by John Rybicki (April 10).

– John Mortara, Lookout Intern

The Lookout Team Goes to the National Book Awards

While the Lookout Team was in New York, nervously pushing broccolini around our plates and awaiting the fiction announcement, an enormous (and enthusiastic) group of UNCW students, colleagues, and supporters squeezed into Costello’s Piano Bar in downtown Wilmington, NC to watch the ceremony stream live on the big screen and cheer on Lookout Books’ starlet Edith Pearlman.

Be still our hearts.

The very next night, you came out again. Two hundred people showed up to hear Steve Almond read at Lumina Theatre in Wilmington and to help celebrate the publication of Lookout’s second title, God Bless America.

Whether in the piano bar, the theatre, or curled up with your laptop in bed, you have supported us and literature in ways large and small—not only this week, but for the past year, as we’ve launched an imprint in an inhospitable publishing climate, as we’ve stumbled and succeeded and celebrated. We want to say thank you. Thank you for buying and reading our books, for sharing them, for believing in books as objects of art, as machines capable of rescue. For believing that literature matters.

We’re just getting started!

Love, your Lookout Team

See more photos from the National Book Awards taken by the Lookout staff.

The Luckiest Interns

One of the three interns invited to share in Edith Pearlman’s success at the National Book Awards this year, Arianne Beros wrote a featured article for Wilmington’s Star News.

Once we were settled in her office, Emily took a deep breath, pressed her hands together, and said, “We’re taking you with us to the National Book Awards ceremony.”

We were so stunned that no one spoke for a few seconds. What an incredible, unexpected opportunity.

Read the entire article here!

Today’s Binocular Vision excerpt from “Self-Reliance”

Sipping, not thinking, she drifted on a cobalt disk under an aquamarine dome. Birches bent to honor her, tall pines guarded the birches. She looked down the length of her body. She had not worn rubber boat shoes, only sandals, and her ten toenails winked flamingo.

The spring was in the middle of the roughly circular pond. Usually a boat given its freedom headed in that direction. Today, however, the canoe was obeying some private instructions. It had turned eastward; the lowering sun at her back further brightened her toenails. Her craft was headed toward the densely wooded stretch of shore where there were no houses. It was picking up speed. Cornelia considered shaking herself out of her lethargy, lifting the paddle, resuming control; but instead she watched the prow make its confident way toward trees and moist earth. It would never attain the shore, though, because there seemed to be a gulf between pond and land. No one had ever remarked on this cleavage. Perhaps it had only recently appeared, a fault developing in the last week or two; perhaps the land had receded from the pond or the pond recoiled from the land; at any rate, there it was: fissure, cleft…falls.

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Today’s Binocular Vision excerpt from “Lineage”

“There was a ravine where crystal water bubbled. On a branch hung a funnel-shaped ladle made of birch. They drank the cold fresh water. They walked along a winding path to an unused hunting lodge. They spoke of Dickens, of Dürer … favorite topics of well-bred Russians. In the late-afternoon sun the air was full of amber droplets, and everything was as if bathed in warm tea—the trees, the wet lane, even the faces of the two people who had not yet touched one another. This is the Russian spring.

“My mother’s eyes were hazel and her teeth were widely spaced. Her skin was freckled, her curly hair light brown. As a member of the household, she had seen that Nicholas was prodded and worried by the adored empress and the detested monk. She pitied the Little Father. She was not raped that afternoon, not seduced; seigneurial right was not exercised. She collaborated in her own deflowering. His hands were gentle. His eyes were the brown of a thrush, and his beard too. There was only a little pain. There was extreme sweetness.

“And then came an extraordinary moment. She looked up, into his brown gaze, and she saw his murder, the murder that would take place five years later, in July.

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